I Lived a Day According to Ben Franklin’s Schedule and It Changed My Life

I found this article a rewarding read, and so I pass it on to you, friends. — Ronald Joseph Kule, Author

DECEMBER 6, 2013 BY 

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Long before to-do-list apps existed Benjamin Franklin was providing us with a daily schedule for success.

Long before to-do-list apps existed Benjamin Franklin was providing us with a daily schedule for success. Considering that my current reminder/checklist system consists of emailing myself tasks, I figured a day living by a Founding Father’s plan would be a fantastic experiment. Would a 222 year old daily routine still work? Would it be so effective I would want to start my own country?

What follows is my experience with the routine Franklin recommended in his 1791 autobiography. His plan is in bold and what I did follows after. Here is his proposed schedule.

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, 1791

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, 1791

5AM-8AM: The morning question, What good shall I do today? Rise, wash, and address Powerful Goodness; contrive day’s business and take the resolution of the day; prosecute the present study; and breakfast.

The 5AM wakeup time was gnarly, but the rest of the morning routine was great because it removed all traces of my usual morning rush. I had more time to brush my teeth, floss (don’t usually do that, don’t judge me!), and pick out a pretty fly outfit. I took “contrive day’s business” to mean I should set out some goals for the day and “prosecute the present study” as me setting up a clear plan on how to accomplish them. I set four work goals and three personal goals, including one which was to give out 3 compliments to satisfy the “good today” portion of the schedule. I never set goals for individual work days so this aspect was welcome. Breakfast was the pan-dulces my girlfriend and I recently got in East LA (wonder what Franklin would think about those) and green tea. As for the first part on reflecting on “Powerful Goodness,” it was nothing less than mind melting. I don’t know about you, but I NEVER wake up and think about God/Fate/The Universe. I found that considering it injected a purpose to my daily goals and connected me to something larger than myself. I found myself asking: Who am I in the face of the Universe if not just a bro who wants to get stuff done?

8AM-12PM Work.

Upon arriving at work, I wrote my earlier established goals down and kept them on my desk. With them in mind, I was actually more focused on what I should be accomplishing. Not surprisingly, the 5AM wakeup snuck up on me and I needed some coffee to keep me going. Good thing Franklin liked coffee.

12PM-2PM Read or overlook my accounts, and dine.

Franklin was a successful businessman so I imagine he had more legitimate accounts to manage than I do. I used this as time to examine the accounts I had: my bank account and my social media accounts (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Youtube). This involved wishing people happy birthday, purging some friends (again, don’t judge me), and throwing some retweets and likes out there. This was immensely satisfying. It felt like I was assessing my (small) dominion of the online variety. After all, what “accounts” do we really have these days? As for the eating I tackled a titanic burrito and dreamed of adding Burrito Baron to my Nacho King title. However, the nicest part of this time block was the reading because I felt like it re-charged my brain. If you’re wondering, I’m currently reading “The Sister’s Brothers” by Patrick Dewitt and it’s fantastic.

2PM-5PM Work.

I ended up having a 6PM work meeting pop up, but even Franklin himself found the demands of business sometimes modified his schedule, so I was not phased by it. By the time I left work I had actually accomplished 3 out of the 4 goals I established for myself. Honestly, I would have done them even if I wasn’t on Franklin’s schedule but it still felt great to check off those goals.

5PM -10PM Evening question, what good have I done today? Put things in their places, supper, music, or diversion, or conversation; examination of the day.

Even when I’m not following Franklin’s guidance I usually tidy up, eat, and relax when I get home from work, so none of that felt new. However, the examination of the day part was rewarding. I reflected on the personal goals I accomplished and the one professional goal I didn’t. I then wrote new goals for tomorrow and made an action plan on how to accomplish them. As for the evening question, I found it similar to morning’s reflection on “Powerful Goodness,” in that it was very zen. I had done “good” and given out my compliments, but just the mere act of reflecting on that “good” made me evaluate how I wanted to live the next day. It was kind of powerful.

Having spent a day on Franklin’s time I can say that it felt both similar and radically different to my life now. It was similar because, like many people, he spent a bulk of his time working away at his job. It was way different because he scheduled time for goal setting and self-evaluation, an area I’m currently lacking in. It made me examine not just HOW I was spending my time, but also WHY, which is something, in my opinion, that we never think about enough.

Originally posted at TheKnow.com

I hope that you found this article as interesting as I did. Please feel free to comment on my blog page here.

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Master Chef Recipes to Cook at Home – Biography eBook and DVD offer

Each Christmas season, like most chefs, Chef Tell worked his a** off. However, after the holiday was done, every year, he went out and bought all of the newest cookbooks in bookstores and online… and proceeded to study them to stay up with the latest technologies and trends. Additionally, he studied culinary reference books from libraries to sharpen his skills constantly. Thus, Chef Tell became an “overnight success” in America: the most popular TV chef of his time with a fan base of 40,000,000 Baby Boomers — about eight times larger than Julia Child’s. According to TV host Regis Philbin, “Chef Tell started all this television madness about chefs.” Iron Chef Cat Cora wrote, “Chef Tell was a man of great humor and incredible skills in the kitchen. He brought wonderful food to the table as well as love and laughter. The author did an impeccable job bringing to life Chef’s humor and passion for food.” The Philadelphia Inquirer  food writer, Elaine Tait, wrote, “Chef Tell is America’s Paul Bocuse, and the only TV chef whose food always tastes good.” To know more about this German-American iconic personality, and his fascinating life story of overcoming one obstacle after another, go to any online site and pick up a copy of his biography in either hard copy, eBook or audiobook format. Here are some links for those: http://bit.ly/168KfX8 for the audiobook http://bit.ly/156n6oQ for Barnes & Noble hard copies http://amzn.to/15MSoAV for amazon eBook CHEF TELL The Biography of America’s Pioneer TV Showman Chef by Ronald Joseph Kule, forewords by Regis Philbin and Chef Walter Staib, is 452 pages with 70 photos and seven NEW recipes, and contains a DVD offer for home cooks to watch Chef Tell teach cooking different cuisine dishes right on your TV, computer or media player. FOR AUTHOR-SIGNED COPIES OF THE HARD-COPY BOOK go to the author’s website.

© 2013 by KuleBooks LLC and Ronald Joseph Kule. All Rights Reserved.

 

5-Star Book: CHEF TELL The Biography of America’s Pioneer TV Showman Chef

English: Cat Cora in April 2010.

English: Cat Cora in April 2010. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Each Christmas season, like most chefs, Chef Tell worked his a** off. However, after the holiday was done, every year, he went out and bought all of the newest cookbooks in bookstores and online… and proceeded to study them to stay up with the latest technologies and trends. Additionally, he studied culinary reference books from libraries to sharpen his skills constantly.

Thus, Chef Tell became an “overnight success” in America: the most popular TV chef of his time with a fan base of 40,000,000 Baby Boomers — about eight times larger than Julia Child’s. According to TV host Regis Philbin, “Chef Tell started all this television madness about chefs.”

Iron Chef Cat Cora wrote, “Chef Tell was a man of great humor and incredible skills in the kitchen. He brought wonderful food to the table as well as love and laughter. The author did an impeccable job bringing to life Chef’s humor and passion for food.”

The Philadelphia Inquirer food writer, Elaine Tait, wrote, “Chef Tell is America’s Paul Bocuse, and the only TV chef whose food always tastes good.”

To know more about this German-American iconic personality, and his fascinating life story of overcoming one obstacle after another, go to any online site and pick up a copy of his biography in either hard copy, eBook or audiobook format. Here are some links for those:
http://bit.ly/168KfX8 for the audiobook
http://bit.ly/156n6oQ for Barnes & Noble hard copies
http://amzn.to/15MSoAV for amazon eBook

CHEF TELL The Biography of America’s Pioneer TV Showman Chef by Ronald Joseph Kule, forewords by Regis Philbin and Chef Walter Staib, is 452 pages with 70 photos and seven NEW recipes, and contains a DVD offer for home cooks to watch Chef Tell teach cooking different cuisine dishes right on your TV, computer or media player. It is a timeless book of life lessons to cherish for generations.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/12/22/prompt-number-one/

© 2013 by KuleBooks LLC and Ronald Joseph Kule. all Rights Reserved.

Carolina Baseball Book Embraces Gamecocks History

Guest blogger J. David Miller writes today’s post about two editions of an acclaimed baseball book:

“South Carolina Gamecocks Athletic Director Ray Tanner (formerly Carolina’s baseball head coach) believes in miracles. Not only from the late-inning heroics that were staples of his national championship baseball teams — but also for every kid who ever dreamed of playing America’s pastime, regardless of physical handicaps.

“Tanner brought together award-winning author J. David Miller and his co-author Ronald Joseph Kule to write Carolina Baseball: Pressure Makes Diamonds, in limited leather-bound edition, so that proceeds could be used to build a Miracle League Field™ in Columbia, S.C.

“‘It’s hardly just the wins and the losses, the struggles or victories of what we’ve done here in Columbia,’ says Tanner, ‘It’s about children who we believe deserve to have an opportunity to enjoy the pastime that has changed all of our lives.’

“Tanner wrote the foreword to the critically acclaimed Pressure Makes Diamonds. The book is a comprehensive, university-authorized journey through the Gamecocks’ storied 119-year baseball history, culminating with their 2010-2011 national championships. Hundreds of full-color photos preserve Carolina’s revered memories and bring the games back to life.

“There are thousands of children with disabilities who live within driving distance of Columbia, most not able to participate in team sports. They are the driving force behind Tanner’s goal to build a unique baseball complex as close to sparkling Carolina Stadium as possible. His vision will become one of numerous Miracle League Fields around the nation, and the only one of its kind in the state of South Carolina.

“NBC, ABC’s Connecting With Kids, FOX, and HBO’s Real Sports have chronicled the success of the Miracle League. There are 240 Miracle League Organizations across the country, as well as Puerto Rico, Canada and Australia. The Miracle League currently serves over 200,000 children and young adults with disabilities.”

Copies of the Limited Edition — a great gift for people who wish not only to present someone with a beautiful book, but also to help build a Miracle League field in Columbia, S.C. — are yet available in limited quantity. For those who prefer gifts for Kindles and Nooks, there is the eBook edition.

A generous portion of proceeds from each book and eBook purchase goes to The Ray Tanner Foundation to help fund and build a Miracle League ballpark in Columbia, S.C. Your purchase today will make a significant difference in the lives of many children for years to come.

For more information about this book, and other books by Ronald Joseph Kule, go to http://kulebooks.myshopify.com/products/pressure-makes-diamonds-a-timeless-tale-of-america-s-greatest-pastime

Chef Tell – Master Chef and Baby Boomers’ Hero

“Author Ronald Joseph Kule’s excellence can be felt in the pulse that beats from within the pages. His work about the late Chef Tell is going to stir more than just a few kitchen pots. I stood back in amazement as Ron took a complex, infuriating, yet ultimately appealing character, and produced one superbly crafted work of literature.” — J. David Miller, Award-winning Author/Sports Journalist/Hall of Fame head coach, AAA Semi-pro champion SoCal Coyotes
In 1976, Friedemann Paul Erhardt — “Chef Tell” — became America’s pioneer TV showman chef.  Within weeks of winning the audition, he appeared on-air in 30 cities. Within months, 40,000,000 avid Baby Boomer fans in 114 cities—comparable to the fan base of Julia Child—tuned in to Evening Magazine or PM Magazine to watch his 90-second, cooking segments, three times weekly. Personal appearances on The Mike Douglas ShowThe Dinah Shore Show; The Merv Griffin Show, The Jon Davidson Show, and live cooking demonstrations in shopping malls and convention centers, added fuel to the German-American chef’s prairie fire that swept the nation.

No one had ever seen anyone like him: Chef Tell cooked fast, entertained, taught cooking, and made America feel confident enough to try cooking his way, signing off with, “I SEE YOU!” 

 
Chef Tell was the author’s brother-in-law. The hard-cover book, 452 pages, 70 photos, NEW CHEF TELL RECIPES, is available now at the store and makes a great holiday gift. The author will sign your copies.
Author-signed copies available at ronkulebooks.com